The Comparative Value of Various Employer-Sponsored Influenza Vaccination Clinics


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Abstract

Objective:Many US firms offer influenza vaccination clinics to prevent lost productivity due to influenza. Strategies to promote and offer vaccination differ, and the economic value of the strategies is unknown.Methods:Decision analytic modeling and Monte Carlo probabilistic sensitivity analyses estimated the one-season cost-consequences of three types of influenza clinics (trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine only, vaccine choice [trivalent inactivated influenza or intranasal {live attenuated influenza} vaccine], or vaccine choice plus incentive) in firms of 50 and 250 employees, from the employer's perspective.Results:On-site influenza vaccination was generally cost-saving over no vaccination. For the scenario of vaccine effectiveness of 70% and intermediate transmissibility, the incremental costs per employee for a firm of 50 employees were −$6.41 (ie, cost savings) for inactivated vaccine only versus no vaccination, −$1.48 for vaccine choice versus inactivated vaccine, and $1.84 for vaccine choice plus incentive versus vaccine choice. Clinics offering a choice of vaccines were slightly less costly under many scenarios. Generally, incremental costs were lower (1) in larger firms; (2) when influenza was assumed to be more contagious; and (3) when vaccine effectiveness was assumed to be higher.Conclusion:Employer-sponsored influenza vaccination clinics are generally cost-saving.

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