Associations between heart failure and physical function in US adults

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Abstract

Background: There is a paucity of nationally representative data in the area of heart failure (HF) and physical function (PF).

Aim: Examine the relationship(s) between HF and PF in a nationally representative sample of United States (US) adults.

Design: Cross-section analysis of US adults.

Methods: Sample (n = 6623) included adult (≥40 years of age) participants from the 1999–2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Participants reporting HF answered questions related to their abilities to accomplish specific upper extremity and lower extremity tasks, and household chores.

Results: Prevalence estimates of reporting much difficulty or the inability to stand from an armless chair was 9.9% and 4.3% (P = 0.002) in those with and without HF, respectively. Similar estimates were revealed for much difficulty or inability to lift or carry 10 pounds (16.8% and 8.6%, P = 0.0004) and much difficulty or inability to do household chores (13.3% and 6.1%, P = 0.0008). Following adjustments participants reporting HF had significantly greater odds of reporting much difficulty or the inability to stand from an armless chair [odds ratio (OR) 1.93; 95% confidence intervals (CI) 1.25, 2.96], much difficulty or the inability to lift or carry 10 lbs (OR 1.90; 95% CI 1.36, 2.65) and much difficulty or inability to do household chores (OR 2.06; 95% CI 1.41, 3.02) compared with participants not reporting HF.

Conclusions: Findings suggest US adults reporting HF are more likely to report poorer PF.

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