SOLITARY IDIOPATHIC CHOROIDITIS IN THE SETTING OF EXTENSIVE ANIMAL EXPOSURE

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Abstract

Purpose:

To describe solitary idiopathic choroiditis in the setting of extensive animal exposure.

Methods:

A 56-year-old asymptomatic female equestrian with an extensive history of exposure to horses and dogs and a trapper of wild animals and rodents was discovered to have an amelanotic choroidal mass in the macular region and referred for suspicious atypical nevus.

Results:

Funduscopy revealed a deep yellow mass with overlying retinal pigment epithelial thinning and without visible subretinal fluid or lipofuscin. Mild hyperautofluorescence represented unmasking of scleral autofluorescence. Ultrasonography showed a 1.8-mm-thick echodense lesion. Enhanced depth imaging–optical coherence tomography disclosed a dense, elevated scleral mass with “volcanic” configuration, demonstrating choroidal compression and trace overlying subretinal fluid. These features were consistent with solitary idiopathic choroiditis/scleritis. Systemic evaluation for standard cat-related bartonellosis, tuberculosis, sarcoidosis, and syphilis were negative. Horse-, dog-, and rodent-related bartonellosis testing was not available. Observation was advised, and the findings remained stable at 6 months.

Conclusion:

Solitary idiopathic choroiditis is best imaged on enhanced depth imaging–optical coherence tomography as a scleral lesion with “volcanic” configuration and often secondary to previous Bartonella infection. Serologic positivity for cat-related Bartonella decays over time, and testing for horse-, dog-, or rodent-related Bartonella is not commonly used.

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