COMPARISON OF INTRAVITREAL RANIBIZUMAB IN PHAKIC AND PSEUDOPHAKIC NEOVASCULAR AGE-RELATED MACULAR DEGENERATION PATIENTS WITH GOOD BASELINE VISUAL ACUITY

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Abstract

Purpose:

To compare the efficacy of intravitreal ranibizumab for the treatment of neovascular age-related macular degeneration between phakic and pseudophakic eyes with visual acuity ≥0.5 Snellen equivalent.

Methods:

This was a retrospective, interventional, comparative study. The newly diagnosed neovascular age-related macular degeneration patients with visual acuity of ≥0.5 Snellen equivalent were included in the study. The patients were divided into two subgroups: phakic group and pseudophakic. All patients received three consecutive monthly intravitreal ranibizumab injections, and then, reinjection was performed as needed. Patients were examined monthly, and the data at the baseline, at Months 3, 6, 9, and 12 were evaluated. The changes in visual acuity, central retinal thickness, and the number of injections were compared between the groups.

Results:

The study included 96 eyes of 96 patients (56 phakic and 40 pseudophakic). Mean Snellen visual acuity at the baseline, at Months 3, 6, 9, and 12 was 0.56 ± 0.09, 0.64 ± 0.15, 0.62 ± 0.21, 0.60 ± 0.22, and 0.61 ± 0.20 for the phakic group; and 0.55 ± 0.08, 0.63 ± 0.14, 0.60 ± 0.13, 0.58 ± 0.14, and 0.59 ± 0.13 for the pseudophakic group, respectively. The change in mean visual acuity and central retinal thickness at the study visits was not statistically significant between the 2 groups (P > 0.05 for all). Mean injection number at Month 12 was 4.5 and 4.3 in the phakic and pseudophakic group, respectively (P = 0.5).

Conclusion:

Intravitreal ranibizumab treatment on an as-needed treatment regimen is effective in preserving vision and improving central retinal thickness in both the phakic and pseudophakic group of neovascular age-related macular degeneration patients with good baseline visual acuity.

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