MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING AND COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY FOR THE DETECTION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF NONMETALLIC INTRAOCULAR FOREIGN BODIES

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Abstract

Purpose:

To perform a comprehensive comparative analysis of nonmetallic intraocular foreign bodies (IOFBs) using computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

Methods:

An ex vivo model of porcine eyes was used to study IOFBs consisting of 10 different materials: plastic, eyeglass lens, bottle glass, windshield glass, porcelain, gravel stone, concrete, wood, thorn, and pencil graphite. The study included 30 eyes with IOFBs and 6 control eyes. Each eye was scanned by CT and MRI. Images were analyzed by three-dimensional viewing software to determine distinguishing characteristics for each material.

Results:

Analysis of MRI and CT scans yielded distinguishing characteristics for each of the 10 materials, and this information was integrated into a clinical algorithm that enables their distinction. More materials were identified by MRI than by CT, and smaller IOFB size was associated with lower detectability. Review of CT and head-coil MRI scans by masked specialists yielded a 95% agreement rate and allowed detection of most IOFBs.

Conclusion:

Magnetic resonance imaging was superior to CT in IOFB detection. Using these modalities, a set of distinguishing characteristics was established for the identification of the 10 studied materials. We recommend MRI to be part of the evaluation of patients with a suspected IOFB, after CT to rule out metallic IOFBs.

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