ENHANCED DEPTH IMAGING OPTICAL COHERENCE TOMOGRAPHY FEATURES IN AREAS OF CHORIOCAPILLARIS HYPOPERFUSION

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Abstract

Purpose:

To detect choriocapillaris changes by enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography (EDI-OCT) in areas of choriocapillaris hypoperfusion visualized on indocyanine green angiography.

Methods:

Combined indocyanine green angiography and EDI-OCT from patients diagnosed with inflammatory choriocapillaris hypoperfusion were retrospectively analyzed. The EDI-OCTs were compared with indocyanine green angiography to detect choriocapillaris changes suggestive of choriocapillaris hypoperfusion in both active stage (AS) and inactive stage of the disease. The EDI-OCT was graded by two independent observers for choriocapillaris pattern (normal/altered) and reflectivity (hyper/hypo/isoreflective) changes. Manual measurements of choriocapillaris thickness were obtained. Interobserver agreement was assessed using Cohen's kappa, and differences in groups were assessed using McNemar's test.

Results:

Forty-two lesions from 11 eyes (8 patients, 3 males) were analyzed. Three patients (4 eyes, 17 lesions) were diagnosed with serpiginous choroiditis, and 5 patients (7 eyes, 25 lesions) were diagnosed with acute posterior multifocal placoid pigmented epitheliopathy. All the lesions demonstrated choriocapillaris hyporeflectivity on EDI-OCT during AS and isoreflectivity during inactive stage. The characteristic choriocapillaris dotted pattern was absent during AS. Choriocapillaris thickness at the sites of hypoperfusion was significantly higher during AS (63.07 ± 16.47 μm) than in inactive stage (22.92 ± 7.65 μm) (P < 0.001). Disruption of retinal pigment epithelium during AS was strongly associated with choriocapillaris atrophy during follow-up (P < 0.001).

Conclusion:

The EDI-OCT shows characteristic choriocapillaris changes suggestive of choriocapillaris hypoperfusion that correlate with ischemia on indocyanine green angiography during both AS and inactive stage of the disease.

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