PROSPECTIVE RANDOMIZED TRIAL ASSESSING THE IMPACT OF FEEDBACK MECHANISMS ON PATIENT POSITIONING

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Abstract

Purpose:

To investigate the use of a head-fixed feedback sensor to improve good positioning times after macular hole or retinal detachment surgery. The instructional methods, macular hole closure rates, and questionnaire responses were also evaluated.

Methods:

After randomization, sensor devices with different feedback types (none/acoustic/vibration) were fixed on the patients' heads. Two positioning recommendations (verbal/illustrated) were used. The posturing data were logged every 500 ms for 24 hours.

Results:

Forty-eight data sets (24 per group) were evaluated. Using sensory feedback, the median time for face-down positioning after macular hole surgery (Group 1) was significantly boosted from 463 minutes (range: 61–1,168) to 1,257 minutes (range: 1,024–1,327). The side positioning time after retinal detachment surgery (Group 2) increased from a median of 1,032 minutes (range: 520–1,165) to 1,284 minutes (range: 1,231–1,437). The night-time alarm records were reduced; however, the instructional methods exhibited no noteworthy effects. The questionnaires indicated positive acceptance of the sensors.

Conclusion:

Sensory feedback may help in cases where face-down or side positioning is recommended. These constant reminders were superior to verbal or written reminders; however, further studies are required to assess the clinical impact of sensory feedback on patient positioning.

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