Inhibitory Effect of Imiquimod-Induced Psoriasis-Like Skin Inflammation in Mice by Histamine H4 Receptor Agonist 4-Methylhistamine

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Abstract

Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory immune-mediated autoimmune skin disorder. The histamine H4 receptor (H4R) agonist 4-methylhistamine (4-MH) plays an important role in immunomodulation of inflammatory responses associated with allergic inflammatory diseases. In this study, we investigated the effects of H4R agonist 4-MH on the development of imiquimod (IMQ)-induced psoriasis-like skin inflammation in mice and explored the immunoregulatory mechanism involved. The total clinical severity scores were significantly ameliorated by treatment with 4-MH (20 mg/kg) and 4-MH (40 mg/kg). Histological analysis of the skin revealed that 4-MH (20 mg/kg) and 4-MH (40 mg/kg) significantly attenuated the psoriatic phenotypes, including epidermal hyperplasis, hyperkeratosis and lymphocytes infiltration. Treatment with 4-MH (20 mg/kg) and 4-MH (40 mg/kg) led to reductions in the levels of Th1 cytokines (TNF-α, IFN-α, and IL-27) in the serum and dorsal skin, whereas Th17 cytokines levels (IL-17A and IL-23) did not change in response to treatment with 4-MH (20 mg/kg) and 4-MH (40 mg/kg). Furthermore, the number of CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ regulatory T (Treg) cells was significantly increased by treatment with 4-MH (40 mg/kg). Taken together, these results imply that H4R agonist 4-MH might be an effective immunomodulatory approach for treatment of patients with psoriasis and the effects may be related to inhibited epidermal alteration, selectively reduced Th1 pro-inflammatory cytokines, and recruited CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ Treg cells.

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