ISOLATION OF BONAFIDE DIFFERENTIALLY EXPRESSED GENES IN THE 18-HOUR SEPSIS LIVER BY SUPPRESSION SUBTRACTIVE HYBRIDIZATION

    loading  Checking for direct PDF access through Ovid

Abstract

ABSTRACT—

In late sepsis, it has been established that the liver plays a major role in the initiation of multiorgan failure, which is the most lethal complication in hospitals. The molecular mechanism underlying liver failure that results from sepsis remains elusive. This study was undertaken to identify the bona fide differentially expressed genes in the 18-h septic liver by suppression subtractive hybridization, and the data were corroborated by Northern blot analysis. The differential gene expression profile renders a clue as to the genes involved in septic liver failure. The cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) model of a polymicrobial septic rat was used, with the late sepsis referring to animals sacrificed at 18 h after CLP. We have identified three upregulated genes (TII-kininogen, serine protease inhibitor 2.2 [Spi2.2], and α2 macroglobulin [α2M]) and six down-regulated genes (hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase [3αHSD], EST189895/mouse RNase4, bile acid-CoA-amino acid N-acyltransferase [kan-1/rBAT], IF1, albumin, and α2u-globulins [α2u-G PGCL1]). Among these genes, the 3αHSD and kan-1/rBAT are involved in bile acid metabolism. The IF1 plays a crucial role in any disease that involves ATP hydrolysis by F1F0-ATPase. The α2M, TII-kininogen, and Spi2.2 are protease inhibitors. The functions of the α2u-G PGCL1 and EST189895/mouse RNase4 genes are unknown. The present results suggest that the roles of disturbance of bile acid metabolism/synthesis and the abolishment of ATP production may contribute to liver failure during late sepsis.

Related Topics

    loading  Loading Related Articles