Increased external hip-rotation strength relates to reduced dynamic knee control in females: paradox or adaptation?

    loading  Checking for direct PDF access through Ovid

Abstract

The purpose of the present study was to examine the relationship between hip muscle strength (abduction and external rotation) and frontal-plane knee control during drop jumping in recreational female athletes. Thirty-three healthy young recreational female athletes were included. Maximal isometric hip abduction and external rotation torque were measured using hand-held dynamometry, and frontal-plane knee control during drop jumping was assessed using three-dimensional motion analysis. Frontal-plane knee control during drop jumping was expressed as the absolute (cm) and relative (cm/cm body height) change in distance between lateral knee markers from foot–ground contact to the time of minimal marker distance during the contact phase of the jump. Greater maximal external hip-rotation torque correlated significantly with greater absolute (r=0.48,P=0.005) and relative (r=0.43,P=0.012) change in knee marker distance during drop jumping. Maximal hip-abduction torque did not correlate with the absolute (r=0.18,P=0.31) or relative (r=0.19,P=0.29) change in knee marker distance during drop jumping. Contrary to our expectations, greater maximal external hip-rotation torque was related to greater change in knee marker distance during drop jumping (reduced frontal-plane knee control) in recreational female athletes.

Related Topics

    loading  Loading Related Articles