SIMULTANEOUS SOHO AND GROUND-BASED OBSERVATIONS OF A LARGE ERUPTIVE PROMINENCE AND CORONAL MASS EJECTION


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Abstract

Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are frequently associated with erupting prominences near the solar surface. A spectacular eruption of the southern polar crown prominence was observed on 2 June 1998, accompanied by a CME that was well-observed by the LASCO coronagraphs on SOHO. The prominence was observed in its quiescent state and was followed throughout its eruption by the SOHO EIT and later by LASCO as the bright, twisted core of the CME. Ground-based Hα observations of the prominence were obtained at the Ondřejov Observatory in the Czech Republic. A great deal of fine structure was observed within the prominence as it erupted. The prominence motion was found to rotate about its axis as it moved outward. The CME contained a helical structure that is consistent with the ejection of a magnetic flux rope from the Sun. Similar structures have been observed by LASCO in many other CMEs. The relationship of the flux rope to other structures in the CME is often not clear. In this event, the prominence clearly lies near the trailing edge of the structure identified as a flux rope. This structure can be observed from the onset of the CME in the low corona all the way out to the edge of the LASCO field of view. The initiation and evolution of the CME are modeled using a fully self-consistent, 3D axisymmetric, MHD code.

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