Revisiting the Romeo and Juliet Effect (: Reexamining the Links Between Social Network Opinions and Romantic Relationship OutcomesDriscoll, Davis, & Lipetz, 1972: Reexamining the Links Between Social Network Opinions and Romantic Relationship Outcomes): Reexamining the Links Between Social Network Opinions and Romantic Relationship Outcomes

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Abstract

Abstract.

We conducted a replication and extension of Driscoll, Davis, and Lipetz's (1972) classic longitudinal survey of the Romeo and Juliet effect, wherein they found that increases in parental interference were linked to increases in love and commitment. Using the original measures, 396 participants were followed over a 3–4 month period wherein they reported love, commitment, trust, and criticism for their partners as well as levels of perceived interference from friends and family. Participants also completed contemporary, validated measures of the same constructs similar to those often implemented in studies of social network opinion. Repeating the analyses employed by Driscoll and colleagues, we could not find evidence for the Romeo and Juliet effect. Rather, consistent with the social network effect (Felmlee, 2001), participants reporting higher levels of interference or lower levels of approval reported poorer relationship quality regardless of outcome measured. This effect was likewise evident in a meta-analysis.

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