Does Recalling Moral Behavior Change the Perception of Brightness?: A Replication and Meta-Analysis ofBanerjee, Chatterjee, and Sinha (2012)

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Abstract

Abstract.

Banerjee, Chatterjee, and Sinha (2012) recently reported that recalling unethical behavior led participants to see the room as darker and to desire more light-emitting products (e.g., a flashlight) compared to recalling ethical behavior. We replicated the methods of these two original studies with four high-powered replication studies (two online and two in the laboratory). Our results did not differ significantly from zero, 9 out of 10 of the effects were significantly smaller than the originally reported effects, and the effects were not consistently moderated by individual difference measures of potential discrepancies between the original and the replication samples. A meta-analysis that includes both the original and replication effects of moral recall on perceptions of brightness find a small, marginally significant effect (d = 0.14 CL95 −0.002 to 0.28). A meta-analysis that includes both the original and replication effects of moral recall on preferences for light-emitting products finds a small effect that did not differ from zero (d = 0.13 CL95 −0.04 to 0.29).

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