Unplanned Reoperation of Lumbar Spinal Surgery During the Primary Admission: A Multicenter Study Based on a Large Patient Population

    loading  Checking for direct PDF access through Ovid

Abstract

Study Design.

A retrospective study.

Objective.

The purpose of this study was to identify the rates and reasons, and the risk factors for unplanned reoperation of lumbar spinal surgery during the primary admission in terms of a multicenter and a large patient population study.

Summary of Background Data.

Unplanned reoperation is suggested to be a useful quality indicator for spinal surgery. However, the rates of unplanned reoperation in patients underwent lumbar spinal surgery during the primary admission are not well established.

Methods.

This study was performed to review all the patients who underwent lumbar spinal surgery at three institutions from January 2010 to April 2015. Patients with unplanned reoperations after primary surgery during the same admission were included in this study. The demographics, diagnosis, surgical procedure, and complications of patients were reviewed and statistical analysis was performed to investigate the incidences and risk factors of unplanned revision.

Results.

A total of 3936 patients who underwent lumbar spinal surgery from three institutions were reviewed, and 82 (2.08%) required unplanned reoperation during the primary admission because of wound infection (0.94%), screw misplacement (0.53%), cerebrospinal fluid leakage (0.27%), wound hematoma (0.18%), and neurologic deficit (0.15%). For the diagnosis, patients with lumbar spinal spondylolisthesis had a much higher rate of reoperation (4.3%) than those of lumbar stenosis (2.3%), vertebral tumor (2.2%), vertebral fracture (1.2%), and disc herniation (1.1%) with a significant difference (P < 0.001). The revision rate was significantly higher in patients underwent posterior lumbar interbody fusion than those received transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (P = 0.007).

Conclusion.

Unplanned reoperation rate of lumbar spinal surgery was 2.08% and the most common reasons for it were wound infection and screw misplacement. Patients with a diagnosis of lumbar spinal spondylolisthesis or who underwent posterior lumbar interbody fusion were more likely to required unplanned reoperation during the primary admission.

Conclusion.

Level of Evidence: 4

Related Topics

    loading  Loading Related Articles