Low Serum Calcium Levels Contribute to Larger Hematoma Volume in Acute Intracerebral Hemorrhage

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Abstract

Background and Purpose—

We investigate whether admission serum calcium levels are associated with hematoma volume, stroke severity, and outcomes in patients with acute intracerebral hemorrhage.

Methods—

A total of 273 patients admitted within 24 hours after intracerebral hemorrhage onset was divided into quartiles based on admission serum calcium levels (Q1 [≤9.0], Q2 [9.1–9.3], Q3 [9.4–9.7], Q4 [≥9.8] mg/dL).

Results—

Median hematoma volumes for each quartile (Q1 to Q4) were 18, 9, 10, and 9 mL (P=0.005), and median National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale scores were 16, 11, 11, and 9 (P=0.010), respectively. On multivariate analysis, Q1 had larger hematoma volume (P=0.025) and higher National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score (P=0.020) than Q4. There were fewer patients with modified Rankin Scale scores 0 to 2 in Q1 than Q4 after adjustment for risk factors and comorbidities (odds ratio, 0.31; 95% confidence interval, 0.11–0.84) but not after additional adjustment for hematoma volume and National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score. There were more patients with modified Rankin Scale scores 5 to 6 (P=0.016) and with fatal outcomes (P=0.048) in Q1 than Q4 as crude values, but not after adjustment.

Conclusions—

Low admission serum calcium levels were associated with larger hematoma volume and higher National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score among patients with acute intracerebral hemorrhage.

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