Familial Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Outcome Study


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Abstract

Background and PurposeThe aim of our study was to compare outcome and its determinants in familial subarachnoid hemorrhage and in sporadic subarachnoid hemorrhage in a large and well-documented patient population.MethodsPatients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) treated at the Department of Neurosurgery, Kuopio University Hospital, from 1977 to 1995 were included. Patients with polycystic kidney disease were excluded. The Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) score at 12 months was studied.ResultsThere were 120 patients (97 first-, 15 second-, and 8 third-degree family connections) in 96 different families with familial SAH and 1237 patients with sporadic SAH. Age, gender, and admission grade on the Hunt and Hess scale did not differ between these 2 groups. In both groups >80% of patients were in relatively good condition at admission. The outcome was good (GOS score of 1 to 2) in 87 patients (73%) with familial SAH and in 874 patients (71%) with sporadic SAH. Analysis of 20 variables, including presence of coexisting diseases, aneurysm site and size, amount of blood shown on CT scan, intraventricular bleeding, preoperative intracerebral hematoma and hydrocephalus, as well as postoperative bleeding and vasospasm, revealed no significant differences between study groups. The degree of family connection (first-, second-, and third-degree) did not have any statistically important effect on outcome in the familial group in the Finnish study population. In multivariate analysis the knowledge of familial SAH was not an independent prognostic factor.ConclusionsAdmission status, postoperative course, and outcome were similar in the familial and sporadic SAH groups in this Finnish population, in contrast to previous results. Familial SAH may not be a significant risk factor for poor outcome. (Stroke. 1999;30:1099-1102.)

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