Preoperative biliary colonization/infection caused by multidrug-resistant (MDR) pathogens in patients undergoing major hepatectomy with extrahepatic bile duct resection

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Abstract

Background:

The aim of this study was to review the surgical outcomes of patients who underwent major hepatectomy with extrahepatic bile duct resection after preoperative biliary drainage with a particular focus on the impact of preoperative biliary colonization/infection caused by multidrug-resistant pathogens.

Methods:

Medical records of patients who underwent hepatobiliary resection after preoperative external biliary drainage between 2001 and 2015 were reviewed retrospectively. Prophylactic antibiotics were selected according to the results of drug susceptibility tests of surveillance bile cultures.

Results:

In total, 565 patients underwent surgical resection. Based on the results of bile cultures, the patients were classified into three groups: group A, patients with negative bile cultures (n = 113); group B, patients with positive bile cultures without multidrug-resistant pathogen growth (n = 416); and group C, patients with multidrug-resistant pathogen–positive bile culture (n = 36). The incidence of organ/space surgical site infection, bacteremia, median duration of postoperative hospital stay, and the mortality rate did not differ among the three groups. The incidence of incisional surgical site infection and infectious complications caused by multidrug-resistant pathogens was significantly higher in group C than in groups A and B. Fifty-two patients had postoperative infectious complications caused by multidrug-resistant pathogens. Multivariate analysis identified preoperative multidrug-resistant pathogen–positive bile culture as a significant independent risk factor for postoperative infectious complications caused by multidrug-resistant pathogens (P< .001).

Conclusion:

Major hepatectomy with extrahepatic bile duct resection after biliary drainage can be performed with acceptable rates of morbidity and mortality using appropriate antibiotic prophylaxis, even in patients with biliary colonization/infection caused by multidrug-resistant pathogens.

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