Association between American Board of Surgery in-training examination score and attrition from general surgery residency


    loading  Checking for direct PDF access through Ovid

Abstract

Background:The American Board of Surgery In-Training Exam is administered annually to general surgery residents and could provide a way to predict attrition, potentially offering a point of intervention.Methods:In 2007, a national survey of categorical general surgery interns was performed. Resident characteristics were linked to an American Board of Surgery database of American Board of Surgery In-Training Exam scores. Attrition was determined based on completion of training during eight years of follow-up. To identify residents at risk of attrition, American Board of Surgery In-Training Exam scores were analyzed based on average rank and change in American Board of Surgery In-Training Exam score.Results:Of 1,048 residents, 739 (70.5%) participated and 108 (14.6%) did not complete training. Average American Board of Surgery In-Training Exam rank was higher for participants who completed training than those who did not (51.8 vs. 42.7 percentile respectively, P < .001). Ranking below the 25th percentile was less common among those who dropped out (41.7% ranked below 25th percentile and dropped out versus 51.5% ranked below 25th percentile and completed, P=.06), but those whose rank dropped >16.5 percentile points were more likely to leave training (attrition rate 13.0% with a drop versus 6.0% without a drop, P=.003). In adjusted analysis, a one percentile increase in American Board of Surgery In-Training Exam rank was associated with decreased odds of attrition (OR 0.98, P < .01).Conclusion:Lower American Board of Surgery In-Training Exam scores are associated with attrition, but this difference is small, and some residents complete training with very low scores. A large drop in American Board of Surgery In-Training Exam scores from one year to the next appears to be associated with attrition. Program directors should focus their efforts on these at-risk residents.

    loading  Loading Related Articles