Immunosuppression is not a risk factor for 30-day wound events or additional 30-day morbidity or mortality after open ventral hernia repair: An analysis of the Americas Hernia Society Quality Collaborative

    loading  Checking for direct PDF access through Ovid

Abstract

Background:

Some form of immunosuppression is relatively common in patients undergoing ventral hernia repair. Nevertheless, the association of immunosuppression with 30-day wound events and additional outcomes of morbidity and mortality remains unknown. The purpose of our study was to investigate the association of immunosuppression with 30-day wound events and additional morbidity and mortality after ventral hernia repair by evaluating the database of the Americas Hernia Society Quality Collaborative.

Methods:

All patients undergoing open, elective, incisional ventral hernia surgery from July 2013 through April 2017 were identified within the database of the Americas Hernia Society Quality Collaborative. Patients on immunosuppression within the 3 months before operative intervention were compared with patients not on immunosuppression with respect to the incidence of 30-day wound events, using a 1:5 propensity matched analysis.

Results:

A total of 3,537 patients met inclusion criteria; 200 (5.7%) patients were on some form of immunosuppression at the time of ventral hernia repair. After propensity matching, 1,200 patients remained for analysis; 200 (16.7%) patients were in the immunosuppression group. There were no statistically significant differences between the 2 groups with respect to the incidence of 30-day surgical site infection, surgical site occurrence requiring procedural intervention, or additional 30-day morbidity or mortality outcomes. Patients in the immunosuppression group had a greater rate of surgical site occurrences, the majority of which were seromas (P = .03).

Conclusion:

Immunosuppression is associated with an increased risk of 30-day surgical site occurrence but not surgical site infection, surgical site occurrence requiring procedural intervention, or additional 30-day morbidity or mortality. Additional studies are needed to determine the clinical importance of these surgical site occurrences with respect to long-term durability of the hernia repair.

Related Topics

    loading  Loading Related Articles