A Comparison of an Open and Laparoscopic Appendectomy for Patients With Liver Cirrhosis


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Abstract

Summary:Liver cirrhosis is a critical factor contributing to morbidity and mortality in abdominal surgery, because patients with cirrhosis have a particularly high risk of developing bleeding, infection, and ascites. Laparoscopic appendectomy (LA) recently has gained a lot of attention around the world; however, comparisons between the benefits of LA and those of conventional open appendectomy (OA) for patients with liver cirrhosis have yet to be sufficiently compiled. In the present retrospective study, 40 patients with liver cirrhosis who were diagnosed with acute appendicitis before surgery underwent an appendectomy (OA in 25 patients and LA in 15 patients). This study focused on the operative time, amount of postoperative pain, use of analgesics, the restart of a normal diet, number of complications, length of hospital stay, and cost-effectiveness of the procedure in such patients. The amount of postoperative pain and the length of hospital stay were significantly smaller in the LA group. The mean values of the serum C-reactive protein on postoperative days 1, 3, and 7 were significantly less in the LA group. The number of wound infections and wound bleeding was also less in the LA group. The difference in the total cost of hospitalization was not significant. The cost of the operation was greater in the LA group than in the OA group, whereas the hospitalization cost in the LA group was less than that in the OA group. The results of this study suggest that LA may be superior to OA for the treatment of postoperative pain and postoperative complications for patients with liver cirrhosis. Long-term follow-up studies are still necessary, however, to determine any possible decrease in the number of late complications.

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