High-fructose corn syrup: everything you wanted to know, but were afraid to ask1,2

    loading  Checking for direct PDF access through Ovid

Abstract

The annual American Society for Nutrition Public Information Committee symposium for 2007 titled “High Fructose Corn Syrup (HFCS): Everything You Wanted to Know, But Were Afraid to Ask” served as a platform to address the controversy surrounding HFCS. Speakers from academia and industry came together to provide up-to-date information on this food ingredient. The proceedings from the symposium covered 1) considerable background on what HFCS is and why it is used as a food ingredient, 2) the contribution HFCS makes to consumers' diets, and 3) the latest research on the metabolic effects of HFCS. The data presented indicated that HFCS is very similar to sucrose, being about 55% fructose and 45% glucose, and thus, not surprisingly, few metabolic differences were found comparing HFCS and sucrose. That said, HFCS does contribute to added sugars and calories, and those concerned with managing their weight should be concerned about calories from beverages and other foods, regardless of HFCS content.

Related Topics

    loading  Loading Related Articles