Cardiac Autotransplantation for Primary Cardiac Tumors

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Abstract

Background.

Complete tumor resection is the optimal treatment of cardiac tumors. Anatomic accessibility and proximity to vital structures complicates resection of tumors involving the left heart. The results of standard resection and resection with orthotopic heart transplantation are dismal. We, therefore, reviewed our series of patients with complex left-sided primary cardiac tumors who underwent tumor resection with cardiac autotransplantation.

Methods.

Since April 1998, 11 consecutive patients with complex left atrial or left ventricular intracavitary cardiac tumors underwent 12 resections using cardiac autotransplantation—cardiac explantation, ex vivo tumor resection with cardiac reconstruction, and cardiac reimplantation. Demographics, tumor histology, operative data, and mortality were analyzed. Follow-up was complete in all patients.

Results.

Complete resection by cardiac autotransplantation was used in 7 patients with left atrial sarcoma, 1 patient with left ventricular sarcoma, 2 patients with left atrial paraganglioma, and 1 patient with a complex giant left atrial myxoma. Eight patients had previous resection of their cardiac tumor, and 1 patient had a repeat autotransplantation for recurrent disease. There were no operative deaths. Median overall survival was 18.5 months in patients with sarcomas. All patients with benign tumors are alive without evidence of recurrence.

Conclusions.

Cardiac autotransplantation is a feasible technique for resection of complex left-sided cardiac tumors. Recurrent disease after previous resections can be safely treated with this technique. Operative mortality and overall survival seems favorable in this series of patients. Benefits of this technique include improved accessibility and ability to perform a complete tumor resection with reliable cardiac reconstruction.

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