The influence of body mass index on functional outcome and quality of life after total knee arthroplasty

    loading  Checking for direct PDF access through Ovid

Abstract

Aims

This study investigated the influence of body mass index (BMI) on the post-operative fall in the level of haemoglobin (Hb), length of hospital stay (LOS), 30-day re-admission rate, functional outcome and quality of life, two years after total knee arthroplasty (TKA).

Patients and Methods

A total of 7733 patients who underwent unilateral primary TKA between 2001 and 2010 were included. The mean age was 67 years (30 to 90). There were 1421 males and 6312 females. The patients were categorised into three groups: BMI < 25.0 kg/m2 (normal); BMI between 25.0 and 39.9 kg/m2 (obese); and BMI ≥ 40.0 kg/m2 (morbidly obese).

Results

Compared with the normal and obese groups, the mean LOS was longer by one day (95% confidence interval (CI) 0 to 2) in the morbidly obese group (p = 0.003 and p = 0.001 respectively). The 30-day re-admisison rate was also higher in the morbidly obese group compared to the obese group (OR 2.323, 95% CI 1.101 to 4.900, p = 0.024); and showed a higher trend compared to the normal group (OR 1.850, 95% CI 0.893 to 3.831, p = 0.100). However, the morbidly obese group had a smaller drop in post-operative Hb level by a mean of 0.5 g/dl (0.3 to 0.6) and 0.3 g/dl (0.1 to 0.5), when compared with the normal and obese groups respectively (both p < 0.001). Furthermore, the mean improvement in Oxford Knee Score (OKS) and Knee Society Knee Score (KSKS) at two years follow-up was three points (two to four) and five points (two to seven) more in the morbidly obese group than in the normal group (both p < 0.001). The mean improvement in Knee Society Function Score, and Physical and Mental Component Scores of Short Form-36 were comparable between the three BMI groups (p = 0.736, p = 0.739 and p = 0.731 respectively). The ten-year rate of survival was 98.8% (98.0 to 99.3), 98.9% (98.5 to 99.2) and 98.0% (95.8 to 100), for the normal, obese and morbidly obese groups, respectively (p = 0.703).

Conclusion

Although morbidly obese patients have a longer LOS and higher 30-day re-admission rate after TKA, they have a smaller drop in post-operative Hb level and larger improvement in OKS and KSKS at two years follow-up. The ten-year rate of survival of TKA was also comparable with those with a normal BMI.

Conclusion

Take home message: Morbidly obese patients should not be excluded from the benefits of TKA.

Conclusion

Cite this article:Bone Joint J2016;98-B:780-5.

Related Topics

    loading  Loading Related Articles