Autologous Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Prevent Transfusion-elicited Sensitization and Upregulate Transitional and Regulatory B Cells

    loading  Checking for direct PDF access through Ovid

Abstract

Background

We hypothesized that immunomodulatory properties of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) may be considered for desensitization.

Methods

Autologous or allogeneic bone marrow derived MSC were infused via tail vein at 0.5 M (0.5 × 106), 1 M, or 2 M cells/dose on days −2, 3, 6, 9, 12 (prevention) or 14, 17, 20, 23, 26 (treatment) relative to transfusion in a Brown Norway to Lewis rat model (10 groups total, n = 6 per group).

Results

At 4 weeks, pooled analyses demonstrated that autologous and allogeneic MSC were equally effective in reducing IgG1 and IgG2a de novo donor-specific antibody (dnDSA, P < 0.001). Dose-response studies indicated that moderate-dose MSC (5 M total) was most effective in reducing IgG1, IgG2a, and IgG2c dnDSA (P ≤ 0.01). Time course studies determined that preventive and treatment strategies were equally effective in reducing IgG1 and IgG2a dnDSA (P ≤ 0.01). However, individual group analyses determined that moderate-dose (5 M) treatment with autologous MSC was most effective in reducing IgG1, IgG2a, and IgG2c dnDSA (P ≤ 0.01). In this group, dnDSA decreased after 1 week of treatment; regulatory B cells increased in the spleen and peripheral blood mononuclear cells; and transitional B cells increased in the spleen, peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and bone marrow (P < 0.05 for all).

Conclusions

Our findings indicate that autologous MSC prevent transfusion-elicited sensitization and upregulate transitional, and regulatory B cells. Additional studies are needed to determine the biological relevance of these changes after kidney transplantation.

Related Topics

    loading  Loading Related Articles