Storage of thawed plasma for a liquid plasma bank: impact of temperature and methylene blue pathogen inactivation

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Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Rapid transfusion of fresh-frozen plasma (FFP) is desired for treating coagulopathies, but thawing and issuing of FFP takes more than 40 minutes. Liquid storage of plasma is a potential solution but uncertainties exist regarding clotting factor stability. We assessed different storage conditions of thawed FFP and plasma treated by methylene blue plus light (MB/light) for pathogen inactivation.

STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS:

Fifty thawed apheresis plasma samples (approx. 750 mL) were divided into three subunits and either stored for 7 days at 4°C, at room temperature (RT), and at 4°C after MB/light treatment. Clotting factor activities (Factor [F] II, FV, FVII through FXIII, fibrinogen, antithrombin, von Willebrand factor antigen, Protein C and S) were assessed after thawing and on Days 3, 5, and 7. Changes were classified as “minor” (activities within the reference range) and “major” (activities outside the reference range).

RESULTS:

FFP storage at 4°C revealed major changes for FVIII (median [range], 56% [33%-114%]) and Protein S (51% [20%-88%]). Changes were more pronounced when plasma was stored at RT (FVIII, 59% [37%-123%]; FVII, 69% [42%-125%]; Protein S, 20% [10%-35%]). MB/light treatment of thawed FFP resulted in minor changes. However, further storage for 7 days at 4°C revealed major decreases for FVIII (47% [12%-91%]) and Protein S (49% [18%-95%]) and increases for FVII (150% [48%-285%]) and FX (126% [62%-206%]).

CONCLUSION:

Storage of liquid plasma at 4°C for 7 days is feasible for FFP as is MB/light treatment of thawed plasma. In contrast, storage of thawed plasma for 7 days at RT or after MB/light treatment at 4°C affects clotting factor stability substantially and is not recommended.

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