Hepatic Kaposi Sarcoma Revisited: An Important but Less Commonly Seen Neoplasm in Patients With Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome

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Abstract

Hepatic Kaposi sarcoma (KS) is the most commonly seen hepatic neoplasm in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), found in 34% of patients in an autopsy series. However, the incidence of hepatic KS has significantly declined since the advent of highly active antiretroviral therapy and is not as commonly seen on imaging. We present a case of hepatic KS in a patient with AIDS, which was initially mistaken for hepatic abscesses on computed tomography. We discuss the computed tomography, grayscale ultrasound, and contrast-enhanced ultrasound appearance of hepatic KS and how to distinguish this hepatic neoplasm from other common hepatic lesions seen in patients with AIDS.

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