Fear of and Susceptibility To Prostate Cancer as Predictors Of Prostate Cancer Screening Among Haitian-American Men


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Abstract

Survey data were collected from 143 consenting Haitian-American men to 1) examine if perceived susceptibility to prostate cancer was congruent with the objectively measured disease risk, 2) test the relationship of perceived susceptibility and fear, and 3) examine these constructs for their predictive relationships to screening behavior. Perceived susceptibility was highly correlated (p < 0.05) to fear and screening behavior. Perception of risk was much lower than actual risk. Fear was not predictive of either ever having been screened (p = 0.81) or planning to be screened (p = 0.85).BackgroundHaitian-American men have a very high rate of prostate cancer (767/100,000), yet they do not generally participate in prostate cancer screening activities.PurposeThe purpose of this study was to 1) examine if perceived susceptibility to prostate cancer was congruent with the objectively measured disease risk, 2) test the relationships of components of an integrated model consisting of perceived susceptibility and fear, and 3) examine these constructs for their predictive relationships to prostate cancer screening behaviors among Haitian-American men.Theoretical FrameworkAn integrated model consisting of a construct from the health belief model and the extended parallel process model was tested.MethodsA correlational, cross-sectional design was used to obtain a convenience sample of 143 Haitian-American men who consented for study participation and then completed survey measures previously adapted for prostate cancer and rigorously translated into Haitian-Creole and Haitian-French, These surveys measure fear of, perceived susceptibility to, and actual disease risk for prostate cancer. Three hypotheses were tested; statistical tests included simple correlation, t-test, and forward logistic regression.ResultsThe findings partially supported the integrated model in that perceived susceptibility was highly correlated to fear and screening behavior. Perception of risk was much lower than actual risk. Fear was not predictive of screening.ConclusionsHaitian-American men do not recognize their increased risk for prostate cancer, so they are less likely to seek screening. This population must be educated of their true risk so they are adequately equipped to make an informed decision regarding screening.Level of Evidence – IV(Melnyk & Fineout-Overholt, 2005)

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