Association of HIV infection with age and symptomatic carotid atherosclerotic disease at the time of carotid intervention in the United States

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Abstract

The primary objectives of this work were: (1) to describe trends in HIV prevalence among those undergoing carotid intervention (carotid endarterectomy or carotid artery stenting) in the United States; and (2) to determine if HIV infection is independently associated with symptomatic carotid atherosclerotic disease or age at the time of carotid intervention. In a nationally representative inpatient database from 2004 to 2014, HIV infection was associated with younger age at the time of carotid intervention (59 years [SE 0.2] vs 71 years [SE 0.01], p < 0.001), male sex (83% vs 58%, p < 0.001), black race (21% vs 4%, p < 0.001), and symptomatic carotid atherosclerotic disease (18.8% vs 11.0%, p < 0.001). Among those undergoing carotid intervention, there was a significant increase in the prevalence of HIV from 0.08% in 2004 to 0.17% in 2014 (p < 0.001). After adjustment for patient demographics, comorbidities and other covariates, HIV infection remained significantly associated with younger age (–8.9 years; 95% CI: –9.7 to −8.1; p < 0.001) at the time of carotid intervention, but HIV infection was not independently associated with symptomatic carotid atherosclerotic disease.

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