GOODS IN THE ANTHROPOSPHERE AS A METAL EMISSION SOURCE: A Case Study of Stockholm, Sweden

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Abstract

The aim of this study was to quantify the diffuse emissions during use of metal containing goods in the capital of Sweden, Stockholm. The following metals were studied: Cadmium (Cd), Chromium (Cr), Copper (Cu), Lead (Pb), Mercury (Hg), Nickel (Ni) and Zinc (Zn). A major part of the metals are found in a protected environment where degrading processes like corrosion are most limited. However, during the lifetime of some goods the metal release to the environment is significant. The quantitatively most dominant emissions were found for Cu and Zn. The tap water system and roofs/fronts (Cu) represent goods with large exposed areas but with relatively small release rates per unit. In contrast, brake linings, aerial lines and electrical grounding (Cu) and tyres, brake linings and chemicals (Zn) are all goods with high release rates but mostly limited exposed stocks. High yearly emissions are also found for Pb, ammunition and sinkers dominate the calculated emissions totally. For Cr and Ni, stainless steel represent the major part of the stocks, but corrosion was estimated to give only a minor contribution to the emissions. Potential emission sources, i.e. stabilisers, pigments and plated goods dominate the exposed Cd stock. These emissions were not quantified due to lack of data. Hg is currently phased out, but one major source of emission, i.e. the use of amalgam, will be continuously significant for several decades. The importance of the traffic sector is obvious. The emissions from brake linings (Cu, Zn and Pb), tyres (Zn, Pb, Cr and Ni) and asphalt wear (Cu, Zn, Cr, Ni and Pb) are all of large importance for the total emission from respectively metal.

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